21Aug, 2008

ACL Tear: How To Know If You Have A Torn ACL & What You Should Do

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A tear of the anterior cruciate ligament can be suspected if most of these features are present: Patients with a torn ACL generally recall the moment that the ACL gave out. Although the injury may be a contact or a non-contact injury, it usually involves a twisting of the femur bone and tibia bone in relation to one another. As the ACL snaps apart during the injury, very often the patient hears a loud “pop” which may even be heard by others nearby. If it is the ACL that is […]
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21Aug, 2008

Competitive Youth Sports Injuries Today Can Lead to Permanent Damage Tomorrow, If Proper Precautions Aren’t Taken

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by Dr. Mark Sanders As youth sports intensify, American children get bigger and seasons last longer and longer, youth sports injuries have become more common and more severe. In years past it was not out of the ordinary to see a sprained ankle or perhaps a broken leg associated with a youth sport-related injury. But today Orthopedic surgeons like myself are seeing an increase in adult-type athletic injuries such as a torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL), tendonitis, torn cartilage, and torn rotator cuffs. Football is recognized as one of the […]
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7Aug, 2008

Choosing the Right ACL Graft For The Right Person

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When deciding about which type of graft to use for an ACL reconstruction, consider this: A recent study, presented at the 2008 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s annual meeting, has shown that almost 25% of allograft (grafts from a cadaver) reconstructions fail* in patients 40 years and younger. Furthermore, according to many esteemed Orthopaedic surgeons, at least 50% of those patients whose ACL allografts fail, and who want to maintain an active lifestyle, will first need a bone graft operation to fill in the tunnels and then a second […]
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