22Jul, 2014

What Patients Are Asking About ACL Surgery

By: | Tags:

This blog is dedicated to answering many of the questions we’ve received regarding Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction. These are Dr. Sanders’ recommendations for those contemplating this procedure. Recommendations 1. Aggressive presurgical rehabilitation emphasizing normal gait without braces or crutches, normal leg control, full range of motion, especially hyperextension equal to the opposite leg. 2. Surveillance for ubiquitous Vitamin D deficiency and of nasal staph infection. Presurgical treatment for these conditions to hasten bone healing and avoidance of wound infection. Surveillance for other lower extremity disorders is performed which will […]
READ MORE

21Aug, 2008

ACL Tear: How To Know If You Have A Torn ACL & What You Should Do

By: | Tags:

A tear of the anterior cruciate ligament can be suspected if most of these features are present: Patients with a torn ACL generally recall the moment that the ACL gave out. Although the injury may be a contact or a non-contact injury, it usually involves a twisting of the femur bone and tibia bone in relation to one another. As the ACL snaps apart during the injury, very often the patient hears a loud “pop” which may even be heard by others nearby. If it is the ACL that is […]
READ MORE

7Aug, 2008

Choosing the Right ACL Graft For The Right Person

By: | Tags: , ,

When deciding about which type of graft to use for an ACL reconstruction, consider this: A recent study, presented at the 2008 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s annual meeting, has shown that almost 25% of allograft (grafts from a cadaver) reconstructions fail* in patients 40 years and younger. Furthermore, according to many esteemed Orthopaedic surgeons, at least 50% of those patients whose ACL allografts fail, and who want to maintain an active lifestyle, will first need a bone graft operation to fill in the tunnels and then a second […]
READ MORE

31Jul, 2008

Sports Injuries: How to Avoid Orthopedic Surgery

By: | Tags:

Anyone who has ever been involved in athletics knows that minor sports injuries are just par for the course. Muscle strains, sore limbs and pulled ligaments are not anything to be overly concerned about; a few days of rest and you can usually avoid any lasting damage. But sometimes damage such as rotator cuff tears or ACL injuries can require more than just some relaxation time, and serious athletes may sometimes end up visiting a clinic for some type of orthopedic surgery. How can active, energetic individuals enjoy their activities […]
READ MORE

31Jul, 2008

ACL Rehabilitation Program: Getting Back to Your Life After an ACL Injury

By: | Tags:

What does an ACL rehab program involve? After an ACL injury, your orthopedic surgeon will create an ACL rehabilitation program that gets you back to your normal life as quickly and as painlessly as possible. Not all ACL knee injuries are the same, of course, which means that your physicians will take your current physical condition, extent of the injury, and future athletic goals into account as they design your program. The goal of a rehabilitation program is to improve the functionality of the muscles in the injured leg until […]
READ MORE

31Jul, 2008

Cadaver Tissue Fails Nearly 25% of the Time in Young Athletic ACL Reconstruction Patients

By: | Tags:

With an estimated 80,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears each year in the United States, including the recent injury to golfer Tiger Woods, choosing the best replacement ligament for an ACL surgery is vital. A new study just released at the 2008 Annual Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine found that using a cadaver ligament may not be the best choice. The ACL is one of the major stabilizing ligaments of the knee. Located in the center of the knee joint, it runs from the thigh bone […]
READ MORE

3Jun, 2008

“Autografts Vs. Allografts, It All Boils Down to One Inch of Incision”

By: | Tags:

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery is a procedure performed to rebuild a ligament that is important for knee function and stability. In the actual reconstruction phase, a graft is used to rebuild the ligament. The issue that is most important is what tendon will be used to substitute for the native ACL. These grafts can include tissues from patella tendon, quadriceps tendon, hamstring tendon, or grafts taken from a cadaver. Grafts taken from the patient’s own tissues are called Autografts. Those taken from a cadaver are called Allografts. It […]
READ MORE